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Axial Flow Webinar

Q&A: Superior Protection for Pumps and Compressors – Why Axial Flow Check Valves Are Your Best Choice

Posted by Jeff Kane on

Axial Flow Check Valves are used in a wide range of pumps and compressors in a vast array of industries. DFT® hosted a webinar on this subject which outlines the differences between check valves used in their applications, as well as the advantages or disadvantages that each one presents. Here at DFT®, we frequently field… Read More

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Axial Flow Check Valves: The Best Choice for Pumps & Compressors

Posted by Jeff Kane on

Pumps and compressors are used in a wide range of industries such as pharmaceutical, food & beverage, petrochemical, natural gas, power generation, chemical industries, and building maintenance. Pumps and compressors transport fluids and compressible gases, respectively, from one location to another. Axial flow check valves are an important protection for pumps and compressors as they… Read More

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hi-100

Features of the DFT® HI-100® Severe Service Valve

Posted by Jeff Kane on

Severe service valves are used in applications involving periodic or extended exposure to extreme temperatures, high pressures, and/or abrasive, corrosive, or erosive compounds. Due to the harsh operating conditions to which they subjected, these valves often feature specialized construction materials and body designs to ensure they maintain their integrity during use. At DFT®, we’ve manufactured… Read More

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Common Causes of Swing Check Valve Failure and How to Diagnose and Resolve Them

Posted by Jeff Kane on

Swing check valves use a hinged swinging disc to block and control the movement of fluid in a system. As they are used to prevent the reverse flow of fluids or gases, any failure can lead to leakage, loss of pressure, contamination, overflow, and, in the most severe cases, complete system failure. Below we discuss… Read More

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Check Valve Diagram

Why Do DFT® Axial Flow Check Valves Inherently Reduce Water Hammer?

Posted by Jeff Kane on

Hydraulic shock—more commonly known as “water hammer”—occurs when the flow within a pipe is suddenly forced to change direction, which creates a pressure wave that can be characterized by a loud knocking or banging sound. In piping and process systems, water hammer often happens upon closing a valve to stop or redirect flow. It’s important… Read More

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